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20121101
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on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
of these decrees. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing their message. mr. morsi's message now is, with these decrees, i didn't amass sweeping dictatorial powers and my decisions are still open to review by the courts, except for the decision that has to do with the formation of the parliament and the drafting of the constitution. he says this is his way of bypassing the old remnants of the mubarak regime that wanted to derail the democratic process, he wants to save it, that message doesn't seem to be winning over the protesters, a few thousand of them behind me. it's 3:15 a.m., their numbers seem to be growing in anticipation of the 1 million man demonstration scheduled for tuesday. >> they're under calls to decrease the decrees. are there any signs he's considering doing that? >> the way things stand right now, they are not we spoke to a top adviser, we asked him about the possibility of concessions in mounting pressure and here's what he had to say. what kind of concessions are you -- >> translator: it's up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- are you prepared to
demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egyptian cities, aiming their anger at mr. morsi, seems very similar to last year, of course. last year the anger was aimed at mr. mubarak. the demonstrators managed to topple him. today, victor, very similar slogans and chants, chants of leave, leave, leave, chants of we won't leave until this government leaves. the same things, the same things we heard last year and now it looks like these demonstrators, just like 2011, are going to do a sit-in. they're putting up stents, look for this to continue for the coming hours. maybe through the weekend, victor. >> we take this a step further now, reza. the only reason that mohamed morsi was able to take power was because he was elected after the people of egypt decided they were done with centralized power with the mubarak government. why do you think he took this step? what motivated this power grab? >> reporter: well, he won't describe it as a power grab. his opponents are describing it as a power grab. but his position, the muslim brotherhood, which is his movement, their position is they want to
in opposition against mr. morsi. many of them want mr. morsi to step aside. others want him to reverse his decree. but the reason we have a standoff is that mr. morsi, the president, has given no indication that he's going to back down from these decrees, wolf. >> reza sayah in cairo watching this story. very tense situation over there at tahrir square right now. elsewhere in the middle east today they exhumed the body of the palestinian leader i can't say er arafat, they're trying to clear up a mystery. did somebody try to kill him with poison? i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. by december 22nd [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> the lat
square. you look at mr. morsi, the president, the muslim brotherhood, how sher going to defuse the situation? is he going to make any concessions? if he does, will that be a sign of weakness? will there be protests from within the muslim brotherhood? hopefully we'll get some answers in the coming days. >> reza, thanks so much from an active, busy, noisy cairo, egypt. >>> in uganda and nigeria, politicians are trying to introduce new anti-homosexuality legislation that could single out gay africans for persecution and violent attacks. cnn's david mckenzie explains. >> reporter: it's become a rallying cry for the gay community in africa. the brutal slaying last year of ugandan activist david cato, bludgeoned to death at his home. the state blamed a ranry. his friends said it was this. cato's front-page photograph in a tabloid calling for gays to be hanged. i met him months before his death. he was afraid. is there space in uganda to be a man and openly gay right now? >> no. public space, we don't have that. by the way, the problem here is identity. i can be with you, it's fine, w
the scene for us this morning and how important mr. morsi is in the solution we see here. >> reporter: yeah, christine, this is another critical day in this conflict. a lot of people anxious to see what happens in the coming hours. it's a little after 12:00 noon cairo time and in a couple of hours secretary clinton is scheduled to arrive in cairo meeting with the egyptian president mohammad morsi as well as the arab league. whenever big conflicts happen in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role as peacemaker. that is clearly why mrs. clinton is in the region today, but it is also clear that throughout the past few days it's been egypt that's taking the lead as peacemaker. obviously, they have strong links to hamas and they also have links with israel with that peace treaty they have promised to abide by. so they seem to be logical peacemaker. yesterday they were optimistic that a cease-fire would be established. mr. morsi says he expects the aggression to stop. obviously, christine, that didn't happen. heavy fighting throughout the night and the early morning h
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)